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What is Ham Radio? (click here)

What is Ham Radio? (click here)

What is Ham Radio?   Amateur Radio (ham radio) is a popular hobby and service that brings people, electronics and communication together. People use ham radio to talk across town, around the world, or even into space, all without the Internet or cell phones. It's fun, social, educational, and can be a lifeline during times of need. You can set up a ham radio station anywhere! In a field... ...at a club station.... ...or at home. Although Amateur Radio operators get involved for many reasons, they all have in common a basic knowledge of radio technology and operating principles,...

Why should I get licensed? (click here)

Why should I get licensed? (click here)

Why should I get licensed? Before you can get on the air, you need to be licensed and know the rules to operate legally. US licenses are good for 10 years before renewal and anyone may hold one except a representative of a foreign government. In the US there are three license classes—Technician, General and Extra. Technician License The Technician class license is the entry-level license of choice for most new ham radio operators. To earn the Technician license requires passing one examination totaling 35 questions on radio theory, regulations and operating practices. The license gives access to all Amateur Radio frequencies above...

Ham Radio History (click here)

Ham Radio History (click here)

In 1873, James Clerk Maxwell presented his theory of the electromagnetic field. In 1901 Guglielmo Marconi communicated across the Atlantic with a radio device using high power and giant antennas. To curb interference, Congress approved the Radio Act of 1912, which required amateurs to be licensed and restricted to the single wavelength of 200 meters. In 1914 the American Radio Relay League was founded by Hiram Percy Maxim, who found that messages could be sent more reliably over long distances if relay stations were organized. Transatlantic transmitting and receiving tests began in 1921 and by July 1960 the first two-way contact...

Your First Station (click here)

Your First Station (click here)

Your Amateur Radio station may change, but you have to start somewhere, right? Here are some fundamentals that all Amateur Radio stations have in common: Transceiver Power Supply Antenna System The Transceiver Selecting your transceiver will largely depend on how much you want to spend and what you hope to do. If you want to explore long-distance contacts on the HF bands, you’ll need an HF transceiver. If you are interested in chatting with local friends on the VHF or UHF bands, look for a VHF+ FM transceiver.  Build Your Own Radio Most hams buy their radios factory assembled,...

  • What is Ham Radio? (click here)

  • Why should I get licensed? (click here)

  • Ham Radio History (click here)

  • Your First Station (click here)

Why should I get licensed? (click here)

Why should I get licensed?

Before you can get on the air, you need to be licensed and know the rules to operate legally. US licenses are good for 10 years before renewal and anyone may hold one except a representative of a foreign government. In the US there are three license classes—Technician, General and Extra.

Technician License

http://www.arrl.org/images/view//Licensing__Education_/Technician_Class.jpg

The Technician class license is the entry-level license of choice for most new ham radio operators. To earn the Technician license requires passing one examination totaling 35 questions on radio theory, regulations and operating practices. The license gives access to all Amateur Radio frequencies above 30 megahertz, allowing these licensees the ability to communicate locally and most often within North America. It also allows for some limited privileges on the HF (also called "short wave") bands used for international communications. Learn More

General License

http://www.arrl.org/images/view/Licensing__Education_/General_Class_KF7LUA.JPG

The General class license grants some operating privileges on all Amateur Radio bands and all operating modes. This license opens the door to world-wide communications. Earning the General class license requires passing a 35 question examination. General class licensees must also have passed the Technician written examination. Learn More

Amateur Extra License

http://www.arrl.org/images/view/Licensing__Education_/Extra_Class_AA1PL.jpg

The Amateur Extra class license conveys all available U.S. Amateur Radio operating privileges on all bands and all modes. Earning the license is more difficult; it requires passing a thorough 50 question examination. Extra class licensees must also have passed all previous license class written examinations.Learn More

For more information, submit our online Prospect Package Request form or call: 1-888-277-5289.

 

BCARA provides testing opportunities to obtain your amateur radio license without a fee!

This content was created by ARRL.ORG  The direct link is:  

http://www.arrl.org/getting-licensed


Meetings

BCARA meetings are the 2nd Monday each month at 7pm.

Fairfield Township Administration Bldg. 6032 Morris Rd. Hamilton,OH 45011
This is located on the corner of Morris Rd and Millikin Rd.  Near Butler Tech.  Wheelchair accessible.
 Please join us on our new, high profile, repeater! Serving the entire Tri-State area @ 146.700(-) PL 123 Please check into our weekly Net: Tuesday's on 146.700(-)  PL 123.0 at 7:00pm
HF Round Table Friday's on 10 Meters 28.410 (+ or -) QRM at 9:00pm

ARRL News

American Radio Relay League | Ham Radio Association and Resources

The American Radio Relay League (ARRL) is the national association for amateur radio, connecting hams around the U.S. with news, information and resources.
  • Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Solar and geomagnetic activity increased this week. The average daily sunspot number was up by 52 points, rising from 42.4 to 94.4. The sunspot number peaked at 120 last Saturday, January 15.Average daily solar flux went from 101.6 to 112, peaking at 119.4 on Sunday, January 16. Average daily planetary A index rose from 6.1 to 15.6, and average middle latitude ...

  • FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel named two prominent radio amateurs among her appointments to the FCC Technological Advisory Council (TAC) on January 19. Appointed were Greg Lapin, N9GL, and Michelle Thompson, W5NYV. Lapin chairs the ARRL RF Safety Committee and has represented ARRL The National Association for Amateur Radio on the TAC since 2001.ARRL Laboratory Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI, noted ...

  • The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has posted an opening for an attorney-advisor in the Mobility Division of its Wireless Telecommunications Bureau in Washington, DC.As a principal attorney with mid-to-senior level responsibilities, the individual’s job duties would include working on policy, rulemaking, and legal issues; drafting Commission- and Bureau-level rulemaking and adjudicatio...

  • Citing age, health, and personal issues, Peter Jost, HB9CET, has stepped down as International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 Monitoring System (IARUMS) Vice Coordinator. He will continue to serve as IARUMS Coordinator for Switzerland’s IARU member-society USKA (Union Schweizerischer Kurzwellen-Amateure).IARU Region 1 said that Jost, who received the IARUMS R1 Medal in 2021, has made a major cont...

Solar Data